Statues - Hither & Thither

Great Britain
Cardiff - Caerdydd
Cardiff - Caerdydd (C. & Cty.)

Wales

Alexandra Gardens - Gerddi Alexandra

Welsh National War Memorial - Cofeb Ryfel Genedlaethol Cymru


(Wikipedia)
Ninian Comper & Alfred Bertram Pegram
A.B. Burton (Thames Ditton)
1928

Cardiff - Caerdydd /  Welsh National War Memorial - Cofeb Ryfel Genedlaethol Cymru   Cardiff - Caerdydd /  Welsh National War Memorial - Cofeb Ryfel Genedlaethol Cymru

Description

The memorial takes the form of a circular colonnade surrounding a sunken court. At the centre of the court is a group of bronze sculptures by Alfred Bertram Pegram, arranged around a stone pylon. Around the base stand three figures, a soldier, sailor and airman, holding wreaths aloft. On the frieze above these figures is the inscription in hoc signo vinces (in this sign you will conquer). On top of the pylon is a winged male nude with a sword representing Victory.

On the frieze above the columns are inscriptions, on the outer side in Welsh: i feibon cymru a roddes - eu bywyd dros ei gwlad - yn rhyfel. mcmxiv - mcmxviii
(To the sons of Wales who gave their lives for their country in the war of 1914-1918)

and over the porches: dros for fe droes i farw - ger y ffos yn gorffwyso - yn y nwyfre yn hofran
(over the sea went he to die - nigh the trench, resting, grappling in the central blue)

On the side frieze of the western porch are added the years mcmxxxix - mcmxlv

On the inner side in English (this English inscription was composed by Comper himself):

remember here in peace those who in tumult of war by sea, on land, in air, for us and for our victory endureth unto death

Cardiff - Caerdydd / Welsh National War Memorial - Cofeb Ryfel Genedlaethol Cymru Cardiff - Caerdydd / Welsh National War Memorial - Cofeb Ryfel Genedlaethol Cymru Cardiff - Caerdydd / Welsh National War Memorial - Cofeb Ryfel Genedlaethol Cymru Cardiff - Caerdydd / Welsh National War Memorial - Cofeb Ryfel Genedlaethol Cymru

Annotation

The memorial was unveiled by the Prince of Wales [later King George V] on 12 June 1928. For the occasion, the Prince spoke a few words Welsh:
The Prince Wales had lesson in the Welsh language during the train journey yesterday fiom London to Cardiff for the unveiling the Welsh National War Memorial.
The teacher was Mr Lloyd George, and the Prince proved so apt a pupil that he was able daring the ceremony deliver a peroration in the difficult tongue of the Celt. He remembered every word with confidence, and surprised Welshmen with the correctness of his pronunciation.
This is what the Prince said: "Mewn anghof ni chant fod tra awel dros ci draethau hi," meaning "They shall not be forgotten go long as a breeze blows over her shores."
It was Lloyd George who gave the Prince his first lesson in Welsh in preparation for his investure at Carnaivon as a boy of 17.

Sculptors

Sources & Information

Tags

  • Country: Great Britain
  • Airman (army)
  • Burton (Thames Ditton), A.B.
  • Comper, Ninian
  • Pegram, Alfred Bertram
  • Sailor (navy)
  • Soldier
  • Victory
  • War Memorial (UK - WWI)
  • Location (N 51°29'11" - W 3°10'49")

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