Statues - Hither & Thither

Ireland
Roscommon - Ros Comáin
Roscommon - Ros Comáin

Golf Links Road

An Gorta Mór

The Great Famine

Maurice Harron & Elizabeth McLaughlin
1999

Roscommon - <i>Ros Comáin</i> /  An Gorta Mór   Roscommon - <i>Ros Comáin</i> /  An Gorta Mór

Description

Bronze sculpture of an emaciated mother with two children. The statue stands on a small square looking like a church ruin.

Roscommon - Ros Comáin / An Gorta Mór Roscommon - Ros Comáin / An Gorta Mór

Inscription(s)

An Gorta Mór

This Memorial was erected in 1999 to recall for posterity the people
of Co. Roscommon who died during the Great Irish famine (1845-1849)
It represents the suffering of families and the utter desperation
of the people during that lamentable period of our history
Tugaimís onóir agus omós d'ár muintir
Is fada in iothlann Dé iad.

An Gorta Mór was like a never-ending winter. Its chill of
desolation brought hunger, disease, emigration and death.
Co. Roscommon suffered a 31.5% decrease in its population, the
most afflicted county in Ireland. Thousands flocked to this
Workhouse for sustenance and refuge. Many who died here were
buried in Bully's Acre a short distance away.

This Famine Memorial was unveiled on 25th August 1999
by
Her Excellency Mary McAleese, Uachtarán na hÉireann

This memorial was erected by the
County Roscommon Famine
Commemoration Committee in 1999.

Architect: Mary O'Carroll of
O'Carroll Associates, Roscommon.
Sculptors: Maurice Harron
& Elizabeth McLaughlin.
Contractors: Owen Dervin
& Co. Ltd. Roscommon

Grateful thanks to
the people of Co. Roscommon,
The Western Health Board,
Roscommon County Council,
Mid South Roscommon Rural
Development Organisation and all
who made this memorial possible.

Roscommon - Ros Comáin / An Gorta Mór

Sculptors

Tags

Location N 53°37'22" W 8°11'5"

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Item Code: ie321; Photograph: 21 June 2014
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